Lurking in trees writing down number plates: the life of a junior sleuth

Shadow on grass

Solving mysteries involved taking puzzling clues that were only part of a whole and deciphering them to work out the big picture.

I may have mentioned this before, but I love mystery. As a kid, most of the books I borrowed from the library or saved up my allowance for were about mysteries and the secret societies, clubs and gangs of kids who set out to solve them. Secret Seven, Famous Five, Trixie Belden, Lone Pine club, Encyclopedia Brown, The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, the Buckinghams, Bobbsey twins, Five Find-outers, McGurk mysteries and more. Mystery solving 101 usually involved finding and interpreting clues, seeing strange objects or faint traces, parts of a whole, and then putting them together to solve the crime and catch the culprit. Of course, apart from clues, wearing badges and having secret meetings in sheds and eating afternoon tea were essential – I mean, what would the Famous Five have been without their ‘lashings of ginger beer’?

As a child some friends and I formed our own Famous Five. It wasn’t very sexy to have a cat as a fifth member, so I think we tried to coerce someone’s escaped pit bull pet who happened to lift his leg on our front lawn into being our ‘Timmy’. Some of the activities our Five (or Four) engaged in were lurking up trees and taking down the number plates of passing cars – I think this was supposed to hone our skills of observation, because I’m not sure what else it was achieving. There was a wedding reception venue around the corner from my friend’s house and I think we suspected some suspicious figures were attending, so we snuck into the grounds (in our school sports uniforms) – if that was your wedding and there were some strange kids in grubby school uniforms in some of your wedding photos, it was probably us. I think we’d seen two many 1940’s Hollywood noir films, because we got it into our heads that men who smoked cigarettes were suspicious, especially those who surreptitiously discarded the butts in shrubs and I think we tried to ‘shadow’ or ‘tail’ some likely suspects. in the end I think my friend’s mother discovered where we were and dragged us away for a scolding – like all those adults in the mystery books who refuse to believe the kids, I’m sure she caused some nefarious nicotine-addicted wedding guest to get away with a heinous crime. Like many a misunderstood crime-solving genius, our true value was never quite discovered.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under An adventurous life

2 responses to “Lurking in trees writing down number plates: the life of a junior sleuth

  1. Fun post! I liked all the mysteries, too. Especially the Hardy Boys, but I thought their father was a bit stuffy.

    • Gosh, I don’t even remember Frank and Joe’s father. I think nearly all adults in kids’ mystery stories were depicted as totally unimaginative, stuffy & overly sensible or frail & elderly.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s