Category Archives: Aesthetically pleasing things

Next time you approach one, spare a thought for the door

Red door in a stone wall with tower in the background, Corfe Castle, UK

I do love a good Door – a door is complete in itself, and is also the entry to a new world. Every door has its own character and many bear the marks and scars of age and experience: wind-battered peeling paint, fire-burn marks, water-swollen wood, animal scratches and chew marks, furniture moving-day bumps, rusted hinges.

Doors give messages: a locked door denies entry, an open door spells out welcome, a door knocker invites visitors, a wreath celebrates an event or mourns a death in the household. A door creates expectation and sets the tone: a shiny door may indicate a tidy house, a cracked door a run-down house. They keep people in, or they keep people out, they defend people and their possessions against the elements, they hide secrets or provide entry. Sometimes they are solid and impenetrable, sometimes you can see right through them.

Some doors become friends: the back door of a friend’s house, and some doors become enemies: the locked door of a business you needed to get to before closing time. Some doors are famous, like the door of number 10 Downing St, and some ordinary. But doors in themselves are often forgotten once what lies beyond them has been reached. Next time you front up to one, spare a thought for the door: all it is, and all it has seen.

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The shapes we live in

    

   
 

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A yen for yellow

                                            

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Life, contentment and the present moment

It can be easy to either live always referring to a ‘more glorious’ personal past, or to live referring largely to a hopeful, more glorious future. But what about living in the present? More and more technology, such as smart phone cameras helps us capture every moment, but do we enjoy the moment, or are we just spectators, observers in our own lives, summing up the ‘news worthy’ opportunities? Many movements, such as ‘Slow food’ are trying to help us focus on what we are doing and who we are with in the present moment. To celebrate it, savour it and find contentment in it. The moment I show you may look picturesque, but even more importantly I savoured the moment. I experienced all the things you can’t see from just looking at a photo: the smell of the Japanese wisteria, the atmosphere provided by the impending storm, the occasional drop of rain.

 

 

 

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Positives and negatives, shadows and light

Schwerin

Sometimes it’s not so much what happens to you, as the perspective that you have on it.

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October 10, 2012 · 2:36 pm